SURVEY SHOWS 75 PERCENT OF AMERICANS ALREADY CAN’T AFFORD OBAMACARE PLANS, EVEN AS PREMIUMS SKYROCKET

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SURVEY SHOWS 75 PERCENT OF AMERICANS ALREADY CAN’T AFFORD OBAMACARE PLANS, EVEN AS PREMIUMS SKYROCKET

Milo News

What’s the point of having health insurance if you can’t afford to use it, thanks to astronomical premiums?

According to FreeBeacon’s report on a poll conducted by HealthPocket, half of Americans surveyed said they could not afford monthly insurance premiums over $100. By comparison, the cheapest Obamacare plan for a 40-year-old non-smoker averages around $350. If you look at all responses below that threshold, the figure jumps to a staggering 78 percent who can not afford to maintain coverage under the deteriorating Obamacare system.

This is the third year that HealthPocket conducted this survey, and the $100 cap for half of the respondents has been relatively consistent throughout. Unfortunately, the premiums have been anything but consistent, with Forbes reporting an overwhelming 60-percent increase in premiums since Obamacare took effect. The same review of the years preceding Obamacare showed an increase of under 10 percent, with many age groups’ average premiums actually declining.

Chicago Tribune reported last month that 2017’s Healthcare.gov mid-tier premiums shot up 25 percent from 2016’s rates. The unsubsidized middle-class is absorbing these costs, of course, since liberal logic seems to say that those that work less deserve more subsidies, despite many people out there working multiple jobs and having nothing but increasing premiums and decreasing quality of care to show for it. A middle-class situation detailed in the report references a hairdresser who is already paying $740 a month, and is expecting $1,000 monthly premiums for 2018. Given that outside of major cities, rent across the country can often cost less than some of the expected Obamacare premiums in 2018, the “Affordable Care Act” misnomer is hard to ignore. Read More

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